interrogatory (in-t<<schwa>>-rog-<<schwa>>-tor-ee), n. A written question (usu. in a set of questions) submitted to an opposing party in a lawsuit as part of discovery. See Fed. R. Civ. P. 33. [Cases: Federal Civil Procedure 1471–1542; Pretrial Procedure 241–248. C.J.S. Discovery §§

4, 8–11, 14–24, 32, 55–61; Pretrial Procedure § 57.]

cross-interrogatory. An interrogatory from a party who has received a set of interrogatories. [Cases: Pretrial Procedure 241–248. C.J.S. Discovery §§ 4, 8–11, 14–24, 32, 55–61; Pretrial

Procedure § 57.]

special interrogatory.A written jury question whose answer is required to supplement a general verdict. • This term is not properly used in federal practice, which authorizes interrogatories and special verdicts, but not special interrogatories. Fed. R. Civ. P. 49. The term is properly used, however, in the courts of some states. — Also termed special issue. [Cases: Federal

Civil Procedure 2211–2220; Trial 346–366. C.J.S. Trial §§ 818, 820, 824–825, 928–1017.]

[Blacks Law 8th]