administrative  law.The  law  governing  the  organization  and  operation  of  administrative

agencies  (including  executive  and  independent  agencies)  and  the  relations  of  administrative

agencies with the legislature, the execu-tive, the judiciary, and the public. • Administrative law is

divided into three parts: (1) the statutes endowing agencies with powers and establishing rules of

substantive  law  relating  to  those  powers;  (2)  the  body  of  agen-cy-made  law,  consisting  of

administrative rules, regulations, reports, opinions containing findings of fact, and orders; and (3)

the legal principles governing the acts of public agents when those acts conflict with private rights.

[Cases: Administrative Law and Procedure    1. C.J.S. Public Administrative Law and Procedure §

2.]

“Administrative  law  deals  with  the  field  of  legal  control  exercised  by  law-administering

agencies other than courts, and the field of control exercised by courts over such agencies.” Felix

Frankfurter, The Task of Administrative Law, 75 U. Pa. L. Rev. 614, 615 (1927).

“[A]dministrative law is to labor law, securities regulation, and tax what civil procedure is to

contracts, torts, and commercial law. Administrative law studies the way government institutions

do things. It is therefore the pro-cedural component to any  practice that affects or is affected by

government decisionmakers other than just the courts. Its study goes beyond traditional questions;

it   explores   a   variety   of   procedures   and   it   develops   ideas   about   decisionmaking   and

decisionmakers.” 1 Charles H. Koch, Administrative Law and Practice§ 1.2, at 2 (2d ed. 1997).

international administrative law. 1. The internal law and rules of international organizations.

2.  The  substantive  rules  of  international  law  that  directly  refer  to  the  administrative  matters  of

individual  states.  3.  Domestic  ad-ministrative  law  specifically  concerned  with  international

problems or situations. — Also termed administrative international law.

administrative  law.The  law  governing  the  organization  and  operation  of  administrative

agencies  (including  executive  and  independent  agencies)  and  the  relations  of  administrative

agencies with the legislature, the execu-tive, the judiciary, and the public. • Administrative law is

divided into three parts: (1) the statutes endowing agencies with powers and establishing rules of

substantive  law  relating  to  those  powers;  (2)  the  body  of  agen-cy-made  law,  consisting  of

administrative rules, regulations, reports, opinions containing findings of fact, and orders; and (3)

the legal principles governing the acts of public agents when those acts conflict with private rights.

[Cases: Administrative Law and Procedure    1. C.J.S. Public Administrative Law and Procedure §

2.]

“Administrative  law  deals  with  the  field  of  legal  control  exercised  by  law-administering

agencies other than courts, and the field of control exercised by courts over such agencies.” Felix

Frankfurter, The Task of Administrative Law, 75 U. Pa. L. Rev. 614, 615 (1927).

“[A]dministrative law is to labor law, securities regulation, and tax what civil procedure is to

contracts, torts, and commercial law. Administrative law studies the way government institutions

do things. It is therefore the pro-cedural component to any  practice that affects or is affected by

government decisionmakers other than just the courts. Its study goes beyond traditional questions;

it   explores   a   variety   of   procedures   and   it   develops   ideas   about   decisionmaking   and

decisionmakers.” 1 Charles H. Koch, Administrative Law and Practice§ 1.2, at 2 (2d ed. 1997).

international administrative law. 1. The internal law and rules of international organizations.

2.  The  substantive  rules  of  international  law  that  directly  refer  to  the  administrative  matters  of

individual  states.  3.  Domestic  ad-ministrative  law  specifically  concerned  with  international

problems or situations. — Also termed administrative international law. [Blacks Law 8th]